Opportunity for All

Paid for by Opportunity for All PAC and not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee.
In a debate broadcast by the Arizona Public Media Monday night, former State Senator Amanda Aguirre and Congressman Raul Grijalva discussed jobs. Grijalva said he is seeking re-election because he has shown “consistency” throughout his entire political career. “I’m not tired of the job, I think the job is good, I enjoy it,” he said.
“It wouldn’t surprise me that Representative Grijalva has yet to tire of his job, because he’s not doing it,” Aguirre said after the debate according to one report. “With 400 missed votes, indeed he has shown consistency: He consistently runs away when it comes time to make a critical decision. Arizona needs someone who will represent our state at all times; someone who can get the job done instead of worrying about keeping his own.”

Seen in: The Arizona Daily Independent

In a debate broadcast by the Arizona Public Media Monday night, former State Senator Amanda Aguirre and Congressman Raul Grijalva discussed jobs. Grijalva said he is seeking re-election because he has shown “consistency” throughout his entire political career. “I’m not tired of the job, I think the job is good, I enjoy it,” he said.

“It wouldn’t surprise me that Representative Grijalva has yet to tire of his job, because he’s not doing it,” Aguirre said after the debate according to one report. “With 400 missed votes, indeed he has shown consistency: He consistently runs away when it comes time to make a critical decision. Arizona needs someone who will represent our state at all times; someone who can get the job done instead of worrying about keeping his own.”

Seen in: The Arizona Daily Independent

Meet the Candidates: U.S. House of Representatives District 3 Democrat Race

Name: Amanda Aguirre
Age: 59
Hometown: Yuma 
Office running for: U.S. House of Representatives
Political experience: Four years (2007-2010) as Arizona State Senator; four years (2003-2006) as Arizona State Representative
Family: daughter, Lucy; son, Anibal
Party: Democrat

Please describe your platform: Pro-jobs, pro-family, pro-women’s health, pro-business, pro-military/veterans, pro-Arizona

If elected, what is your first priority? Fixing our economy and creating jobs

What sets you apart from your opponent(s)? I am the only one with a business background that knows what it takes to sustain and create jobs and make the payroll. I am an expert on health care, having worked more than 25 years in the industry helping the uninsured and underinsured. I have a track record of being an effective legislator, having passed legislation that improves the quality of life for our working families, small business community, veterans, cancer patients and children. I am the only candidate that works bipartisan and can facilitate a consensus among a diverse group of people (from all parties) to pass effective legislation. I do not take extreme positions and I do not walk away from voting. Lastly, I will never ask America to boycott Arizona.

What would you do to achieve more transparency in government, and should government officials be in charge of managing those efforts? I would maintain communication with our constituent base and make sure that relevant information to issues pertaining to tax dollars is accessible to taxpayers. We need to maintain good ethics with respect to conflicts of interest. The government should certainly implement the rules and policies necessary to effect accountability and transparency.

What do you think is the biggest challenge right now facing Yumans? Unemployment

What would you do, if elected, to help change that? Small- and medium-sized businesses are the backbone of our economy; thus, supporting these businesses and encouraging them to hire locally will promote job creation in Arizona while preventing jobs from being shipped overseas. When elected to Congress I will collaborate with state and local leaders to do the following:

• Increase government funding to support our economy-boosting and job-creating industries such as farming, renewable energy, biotechnology, education, etc.

• Work to develop incentives, such as tax incentives and low-interest rate loans, to encourage business development, provided that the companies 1.) hire local workers, 2.) buy American products, and 3.) have a long-term business plan that benefits the community.

• Establish one-stop help centers (a.k.a. incubation centers) to support local entrepreneurs during the business start-up phase.

How would you rate how the current office holder is doing, on a scale of 1-5 (5 being the highest), and why? The reason why I’m running is because I feel, like the majority of voters in this district, that we are not being represented in Washington, D.C. Thus, I would rate the current office holder as a 1.

What is one of your strengths? I am always accessible to people and in touch with the communities that I serve.

Weaknesses? I’m a workaholic.

What is one thing that you want voters to know? That their voice will be heard when I’m their Congresswoman — the first Latina Congresswoman from Arizona.


Read more: http://www.yumasun.com/articles/arizona-81104-business-jobs.html#ixzz246nWKeNX

Some Thoughts On Vote Walkout

Letter to the editor found in Yuma Sun

I sent some thoughts to U.S. Rep. Raul Grijalva through his website on the evening of Attorney General Eric Holder’s contempt vote by the House of Representatives:

“I was so proud to watch you walk out of the Holder vote today. How courageous and how brave you were! Making the Terry family’s loss of their son seem so insignificant must have taken a lot of intestinal fortitude on your part.

“I hope and pray that this will be your last opportunity to serve as Yuma’s representative. You are better suited representing northern Mexico and I respectfully suggest that you consider making the move south.”

Bill Baumbeck 

Raul “boycott Arizona” Grijalva

Raul “boycott Arizona” Grijalva

No Grijalva fan

Seen in the Green Valley News and Sun

My first experience in politics was knocking on doors in Minnesota for Jack Kennedy in 1960. Many years later I did the same in Tucson for Jim Kolbe, a good man judged to be “too moderate” by some of my neighbors; and in his first campaign I knocked on doors for George Silva here in Santa Cruz County.

In short I’ve been involved politically in many ways for over 50 years and have supported politicians of many stripes.

Recently, members of my family moved in with relatives in Nogales, the family’s primary wage earner having lost a good job in Tucson. One of the finest things about the Mexican-American culture is how families help each other, and my family members would have loved to remain in Nogales but alas no job opportunities were found.

The most memorable political words I have ever heard were by President Kennedy in his Inaugural Address when he said, “Ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country.” Ah, how times have changed among those who represent us.

I came to the University of Arizona in 1976 as a professor in the areas of economics and finance. Professionally, it is for me especially sad to see the deterioration of the local economy, and to see our most important political leader, Congressman Raul Grijalva, stand out nationally for advocating policies that have been terribly damaging to that economy.

Those policies not only have severely harmed the fundamental base of that wonderful local family structure, the ability to earn a living, but also policies that are at odds with most family and Christian values. I will never forget Grijalva’s “Boycott Arizona.”

To my mind, Grijalva stands as a polar opposite of President Kennedy and I am embarrassed to say that he is my representative.

Larry Leslie, Tumacacori

Grijalva defends 2010 boycott call — again

Reported by The Arizona Daily Star 

U.S. Rep. Raúl Grijalva, D-Ariz. cannot escape the questions about his now infamous call to boycott Arizona — even when he’s in the most friendly of confines.

Speaking Monday to the Democrats of Greater Tucson, the five-term congressman seeking re-election in Congressional District 3 received a standing ovation and warm applause throughout his speech.

But during questions, he was asked yet again about his boycott call in 2010, in which he urged conventions and businesses to avoid Arizona in order to show how destructive SB1070 was.  

As he’s done in the past, Grijalva stood behind his decision, while offering some insight about his thought-process:

“My opponents are running on the fact that ‘Oh my God, he said the ‘b’ word and he has caused all this dire consequences to come the state. Let me be unapologetic: we needed to nationalize this SB1070 issue. We couldn’t let it go in to the dark corner and just be a funny, little thing that happened in Arizona. This was a precedent, and the Supreme Court ruled on the precedent that it was unconstitutional in many aspects.”

“We asked the Attorney General to intervene, we asked the administration to intervene. And we said there is going to be economic consequences and there should be. For a state that can be this punitive, there is going to be consequences.”

“Have I taken some hits on that? Absolutely. But the unapology is about this: We are elected and sometimes, there is a direct attack, there is a direct issue that affects a group of people that are being marginalized… I’m not going to tolerate it. I’m going to speak up every time. I spoke up then and God willing, it will never happen again.”

Grijalva has taken plenty of heat over the past two years for the boycott call and that’s continuing in this Democratic primary for CD3. His two opponents, Tucson physician Manny Arreguin and Yuma businesswoman Amanda Aguirre, have been making it an issue throughout the campaign.

"Sometimes he’s more concerned about his congressional job than providing jobs for the people who helped get him into office," Arreguin said.

"My vision is to be more representative of Arizona, and I would never call for a boycott when businesses are hurting," Aguirre said.

Grijalva took some jabs back at Arreguin and Aguirre on Monday, joking about how Arreguin suddenly had an “epiphany” that led him to recently join the Democratic party and questioning Aguirre’s loyalty to the Democrat party.

He jokingly ‘welcomed’ Arreguin to the Democratic party but said he shouldn’t belittle people like him and others who for decades have been in the trenches struggling to keep the party vibrant.

“This is not a time for experimentation,” Grijalva said. “This is a serious time for Democrats and we have serious fights ahead of us.”

Arreguin was a Republican who switched parties 2 1/2 years ago because he was frustrated with the actions of the GOP in Arizona.

“We just need to remember that just because somebody changed party affiliation doesn’t mean they’ve been lost,” Arreguin said Monday. “Sometimes people move away from political parities because the political party moves away from them.”

Grijalva criticized Aguirre for urging Republicans in Yuma to register as independents and vote against Grijalva him in the Aug. 28 primary.

“This coming from a person that our state party had to prop up four elections in a row,” Grijalva said. “A little loyalty please.”

Aguirre, who was in the Arizona House of Representatives from 2003-2006 was a state Senator from 2007-2010, said on Monday that she’s a lifelong Democrat who remains loyal to the party. She said she has only been reminding independent voters that they can register to vote in the primary. She said if her friends and neighbors who are Republicans and independents choose to back her, that’s great.

Stay tuned to the Pueblo Politics blog throughout 2012 for news, updates and information about Arizona politics. You can follow Arizona Daily Star reporters Brady McCombs and Becky Pallack on Twitter.